Mozambique, Sandbank & Ilha Quirimba (Day 2 , 3)

During the morning, with an old sailing boat of a fisherman, the nice ”captain” Moussa, we head to the Sandbank. This beach, one of the most beautiful and unspoiled in the Quirimbas archipelago, unfolds as the tide retreats, revealing an unending sugar sand spit to explore. Not so far from the beach there is a shipwreck of an old indian boat. If u like snorkeling , you can have a look here looking for the colorful fish that live in this tropical sea. If you are lucky, you can also spot dolphins and turtles from the boat during your ride.

Sandbank, Ibo
Sandbank, Ibo

We spend many hours here on the beach swimming and relaxing, and when the high tide starts coming up, we go back to Ibo. We finish the day cooking fresh squids bought from a fisherman. The third day we arrange with Abu a trip to Quirimba island. It lies south of Ibo and was the Capital of the Archipelago giving its name to the thirty two islands. Afterwards, around 1500 d.c., the capital was moved to Ibo because of repeated attacks from the Arab Sultanate of Zanzibar that tried to conquer the archipelago.

Quirimba island, Mozambique
Quirimba island, Mozambique

Today ruins of original colonial architecture still remain on Quirimba Island making the trip more interesting. Starting from Ibo, we walk for one hour throughout the mangrove swamp until we get the sea. Here is waiting for us a sailing boat that tries to drive us close to the seashore of Quirimba island. The tide is quite low, so , once close to the shallow, we have to get off and walk inside the sea for almost 20 minutes, up to our ankle in water. Along the wide beach we can see some stranded wooden boats and beautiful big palm trees. Before going for a walk, we meet some local people that offer us a good lunch with plain rice, fish and fresh fruit. In the afternoon we take a rest on the beach try to swim, but it’s not so easy because of the tide, then we explore the village with its churches surrounded by a lot of shouting kids. In the late afternoon,at the high tide, we go back to Ibo, sailing through the canal that was cut by the slaves in the eighteenth century.

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